Plagiarism is when an author presents the ideas of another or willfully copies text and presents them as his or her own. Scholarly procedure requires that all borrowed material is identified and attributed to the original source. When researching electronic online sources and/or using information from published or unpublished works, students must acknowledge the original writer and employ correct citation methods.

FAQ’s about Plagiarism

(Adapted from Aquinas College Library: www.aquinas.edu/library/plagiarism.html)

Why is plagiarism such a big deal?

By submitting someone else’s work as your own, you are taking credit for work that is not yours. Plagiarism important not only because of ethical implications, but also because it compromises scholarship and undermines your reputation as a professional.

What constitute plagiarism?

Borrowing ideas (paraphrasing and summarizing), text (quotations), images and graphs without citing the source. Submitting a paper for publication in two different journals constitutes self-plagiarism which can skew the medical literature in favor of one intervention over another while not taking into account the efficacy or safety of the intervention.

Borrowing ideas (paraphrasing and summarizing), text (quotations), images and graphs without citing the source. Submitting a paper for publication in two different journals constitutes self-plagiarism which can skew the medical literature in favor of one intervention over another while not taking into account the efficacy or safety of the intervention.

What is the difference between summarizing and plagiarizing an article?

Paraphrasing and summarizing are very similar. Both involve taking ideas, words or phrases from a source and crafting them into new sentences within your writing. Whether paraphrasing or summarizing, credit is always given to the author. (Accessed 10/16 from: http://www.lib.usm.edu/legacy/plag/paraphrasing.php)

How long does a string of words need to be to be plagiarism?

Just remember that if a source has changed the way you think about something, or if you liked a phrase or image well enough to include it in your own work, cite it.

Rule of thumb: If you take more than 3 words in a row from one source, put quotations around them and cite them.

Is it necessary to cite paraphrased content?

When you paraphrase you are taking someone else’s thoughts and ideas and summarizing them in your own words. As a result, you must cite paraphrased passages. A good rule of thumb for paraphrasing is to condense the original passage by 50% in your own words. Then, cite the passage.

Tips for summarizing and paraphrasing

  • Reread the original passage until you understand its full meaning.
  • Set the original aside, so it is out of sight, and write your paraphrase on a note card.
  • Now, take out the original passage, and check your rendition with the original to make sure that your version accurately expresses all the essential information in a new form.
  • Use quotation marks to identify any unique term or phraseology you have borrowed exactly from the source.
  • Record the source (including the page) on your note card so that you can credit it easily if you decide to incorporate the material into your paper.

(Accessed 10/16 from http://www.mesacc.edu/~paoih30491/ArgumentsQuoteSummarizeParaphr.html)